Chinese freight car types.

Moderators: Moderators, Admin Team

Post Reply
ben_issacs
Chinarail Forum Member
Posts: 60
Joined: 30 Nov 2017, 02:16
antispam: No
The middle number please? (6): 6

Chinese freight car types.

Post by ben_issacs » 22 Oct 2018, 02:09

Folks,
In general, on this forum, the common Chinese freight cars are usually described as box cars or gondolas.
Gondola is a term I think only used in North America, elsewhere it is usually open wagon or car
Box car is another N.A. term, but is sometimes used elsewhere.
Here in Australia these are usually vans or box vans.
But, what are they called in China?
Looking into 'Guochan Tielu Huoche' (National Railways freight cars', and going to say a P64 box car, translating the description into Roman, we get Peng che, Peng giving the 'P' designation.
Then, looking up the English translation we get 'Shelf' or 'rack'!
Shelf or rack, for a box car, that don't make sense!
However, looking closely at the drawing of a P 64 vehicle, one can see that inside the body there are actual wide shelves, horizontally hinged to fold up against the walls.
So, it appears that these shelves can be let down into the horizontal position, and when this is done, the Peng car can be used to transport people overnight, mainly soldiers.
This also explains the little rectangular scuttles in the car sides, these are for ventilation when the car is used as a personnel transport.
However, I think that in this forum, the term 'box car' will continue to be used instead of 'shelf car'!
For the C 64 gondolas, the Chinese title, Romanised, is Chang che, giving the 'C' designation.
Translation into English is not so easy, my little dictionaries give something like 'High', so perhaps se are 'high' or 'high capacity' cars, no doubt some of our Chinese speaking readers can give a better translation.
But, again, I think that the term 'gondola' will continue to be used in preference to 'high capacity car'!
As an aside, during WW II, the U.S, railroads converted box cars for the same troop transport service, calling them 'troop sleepers'.
Regards,
Bill,
Melbourne.

Harvey
Chinarail Forum Member
Posts: 6
Joined: 08 Nov 2017, 17:55
antispam: No
The middle number please? (6): 6

Re: Chinese freight car types.

Post by Harvey » 23 Oct 2018, 15:27

Not sure what "peng" you are looking at Bill. 棚 (as in pengche 棚车) means a shed.
Kind regards
Robin

ben_issacs
Chinarail Forum Member
Posts: 60
Joined: 30 Nov 2017, 02:16
antispam: No
The middle number please? (6): 6

Re: Chinese freight car types.

Post by ben_issacs » 24 Oct 2018, 06:51

Harvey,
Many thanks for your reply, and, yes, the character that you wrote ,'peng', does translate into 'shed', which is a much more logical description of these cars.
Can't work out how I got 'shelf or rack' from the Chinese-English dictionary for this, however, I did look at a Japanese-English dictionary, and therein the character is translated as 'shelf', with no mention of 'shed'. pronunciation, 'tana'.
Still reckon that these cars can be used as troop or temporary personnel transports, the little sliding scuttles at two levels do suggest this role.
Checking the earlier P 60's, which I think haven't been modelled, these definitely were intended for personnel transport, they have shown on their drawing a small stove with a flue up through the roof in the centre of the car, and a squat toilet at one end.
Any thoughts on the open wagon's 'Chang' character's translation?
Regards,
Bill,
Melbourne.

Harvey
Chinarail Forum Member
Posts: 6
Joined: 08 Nov 2017, 17:55
antispam: No
The middle number please? (6): 6

Re: Chinese freight car types.

Post by Harvey » 02 Nov 2018, 18:42

ben_issacs wrote:Harvey,
Many thanks for your reply, and, yes, the character that you wrote ,'peng', does translate into 'shed', which is a much more logical description of these cars.
Can't work out how I got 'shelf or rack' from the Chinese-English dictionary for this, however, I did look at a Japanese-English dictionary, and therein the character is translated as 'shelf', with no mention of 'shed'. pronunciation, 'tana'.
Still reckon that these cars can be used as troop or temporary personnel transports, the little sliding scuttles at two levels do suggest this role.
Checking the earlier P 60's, which I think haven't been modelled, these definitely were intended for personnel transport, they have shown on their drawing a small stove with a flue up through the roof in the centre of the car, and a squat toilet at one end.
Any thoughts on the open wagon's 'Chang' character's translation?
Regards,
Bill,
Melbourne.
Chang 敞 means "open" or "uncovered".

ben_issacs
Chinarail Forum Member
Posts: 60
Joined: 30 Nov 2017, 02:16
antispam: No
The middle number please? (6): 6

Re: Chinese freight car types.

Post by ben_issacs » 10 Jan 2019, 09:12

Harvey,
With the intermittent interruption of service on this web site, I haven't been able to say thanks to you for the 'chang' translation of 'uncovered' or 'open'.
So, the C wagons can be called open wagons, which ties in with most railway administrations usage outside North America.
The use of the term 'gondola' always makes me wonder, anything less likely in appearance to the graceful Venetian water craft is hard to imagine.
Regards,
Bill,
Melbourne.

Post Reply